Pineapples: Sweet & Sour Make You Love Him More

45 / 100 SEO Score

The pineapple is a tropical plant with an edible fruit, also called a pineapple, and the most economically significant plant in the family Bromeliaceae. Pineapples may be cultivated from the offset produced at the top of the fruit, possibly flowering in five to ten months and fruiting in the following six months.

Pineapples are tropical fruits that are rich in vitamins, enzymes and antioxidants. They may help boost the immune system, build strong bones and aid indigestion. And, despite their sweetness, pineapples are low in calories.

Pineapples are members of the bromeliad family, and are the only bromeliad that produces edible fruit, according to the Purdue University Center for New Crops and Plant Products. The fruit is made of many individual berries that grow together around a central core. Each pineapple scale is an individual flower, or berry.

The nutritional benefits of pineapples are as attractive as their unique anatomy. “Pineapples contain high amounts of vitamin C and manganese,” said San Diego-based nutritionist Laura Flores. These tropical fruits are also a good way to get important dietary fiber and bromelain (an enzyme).

Historic

Christopher Columbus brought pineapples back to Europe after an expedition to South America. Pineapples became known as an extravagant and exotic fruit, served only at the most lavish of banquets.

However, pineapples are now common, and people are able to enjoy them in solid, dried, and juice forms.

In Central and South America, pineapple is not only valued for its sweet taste, it has been used for centuries to treat digestion problems and inflammation.

This article explores the health benefits and nutrition of pineapple, as well as providing ways to include it in the diet.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nutrition Facts & Figures

One cup of fresh pineapple chunks contains approximately:

  • 82 calories
  • 0.2 grams (g) of fat
  • 0 g of cholesterol
  • 2 milligrams (mg) of sodium
  • 21.65 g of total carbohydrate (including 16 grams of sugar and 2.3 grams of fiber)
  • 0.89 g of protein

As a percentage of your daily requirements, the same amount of fresh pineapple chunks provides:

  • 131 percent of vitamin C
  • 2 percent of vitamin A
  • 2 percent of calcium
  • 3 percent of iron

Pineapple is also a source of important vitamins and minerals, including:

Fresh pineapple is the only known source of an enzyme called bromelain, which might play a role in a range of different health benefits.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The nutritional profile for canned pineapple is different from raw pineapple. According to the USDA, canned pineapple is typically higher in calories and higher in sugar. It also contains fewer vitamins and minerals. If you do opt for canned pineapple, try to get it with no added sugar or look for a variety that is canned in fruit juice instead of syrup.

Pineapple contains a significant amount of vitamin C, a water-soluble antioxidant that fights cell damage, according to the Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University. This makes vitamin C a helpful fighter against problems such as heart disease and joint pain.

The variety of vitamins and minerals in pineapples have many other health benefits, too. For example, pineapples can help reduce the risk of macular degeneration, a disease that affects the eyes as people age, due in part to its high amount of vitamin C and the antioxidants it contains,” Flores said

Health Risk

“Because pineapple is a great meat tenderizer, eating too much can result in tenderness of the mouth, including the lips, tongue and cheeks,” Flores said. “But, [it] should resolve itself within a few hours.” But if the feeling persists, or if you experience a rash, hives or breathing difficulties, you should seek medical help immediately, as you could have a pineapple allergy.

Flores pointed out a possible negative to pineapple’s high levels of vitamin C. “Because of the high amount of vitamin C that pineapples contain, consuming large quantities may induce diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain or heartburn,” she said.

Additionally, extremely high amounts of bromelain can cause skin rashes, vomiting, diarrhea, and excessive menstrual bleeding, according to the University of Maryland Medical Center. Bromelain can also interact with some medications. Those taking antibiotics, anticoagulants, blood thinners, anticonvulsants, barbiturates, benzodiazepines, insomnia drugs and tricyclic antidepressants should be careful not to eat too much pineapple.

I Want You To Eat Me 🙂

Leave a Reply